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The Irish Annals

The Annals of the Four Masters (and Annals of Ulster) show that:

St Moluag died on 25 June 592 and he was followed by

  • Neman, Abbot of Lismore died in 610
  • St. Eochaidh, Abbot of Lismore died on 17th April 634
  • St. Mochuda, having trained on Lismore, founded the Lismore in Ireland, became Bishop of Lismore, Ireland and Abbot of Raithin Rahen, and died on the 14th of May 636.

    (Lismore in Ireland is therefore named after Lismore in Alba and further references clearly differentiate the two eg in the Annals of Ulster ‘U833.10 The burning of Les Mór Mo-Chutu and a slaughter of the people of Desmumu’ and from the Annals of the Four Masters ‘M831.4 The plundering of Lis Mor Mochuda.’)

  • Iarnla, Abbot of Lismore died in 698
  • Colman, son of Finnbhar, Abbot of Lismore died in 702
  • Cronan Ua Eoan, Abbot of Lismore died on the 1st of June 716
  • St. Maccoigeth, Abbot of Lismore died on the 3rd of December 748
  • Sinchu, Abbot of Lismore died in 752
  • Condath, Abbot of Lismore died in 755
  • Aedhan, Abbot of Lismore died in 763
  • Soairleach Ua Concuarain, Abbot of Lismore died in 769
  • Eoghan, son of Roinchenn, Abbot of Lismore died in 771
  • Orach, Abbot of Lismore died in 776
  • Carabran, Abbot of Lismore died in 799
  • Flann, son of Foircheallach, Abbot of Lismore died in 823
  • Tibraide Ua Baeitheanaigh, Abbot of Lismore died in 849
  • Suibhne Ua Roichlich, Abbot of Lismore died in 854
  • Martin Ua Roichligh, Abbot of Lismore died in 878
  • Maelbrighde, son of Maeldomhnaigh, Abbot of Lismore died in 907
  • Ciaran, son of Ciarman, Abbot of Lismore died in 936
  • Diarmaid, son of Torpthach, Abbot of Lismore died in 951
  • Maenach, son of Cormac, Abbot of Lismore died in 957


“Appin An Apain was of old Apthane, and, like Appin of Dull in Perthshire, indicated the territory of an old Celtic monastery. On the island was established the see of Argyle in 1236, but long before that date it was the chief residence of Saint Moluag, an Irish saint who earned great fame in Argyle and much further afield. On this island he set up his little church, and to protect it from marauding clansmen he had it and the conventual buildings surrounded with a vallum, much in the manner of the ancient hill forts. This was a common practice of the Irish missionaries and there are many instances of it on record, more especially in Ireland. It is from this vallum that the island has its name, Lismore, the great enclosure, Gaelic lis, a fortified place. This is the real meaning of Lismore and not the ‘‘great garden as is so often given.” (Based on an article written by James E. Scott that appeared in the TRANSACTIONS OF THE GAELIC SOCIETY OF INVNERNESS Vol. xlviii (1972 - 74). The article is entitled: Lismore and Appin. James E. Scott died in December 1973.

Last updated 22 May, 2008